Helpful Consumer Links

 


 

United States Savings Bonds
The Bureau of the Public Debt announced today that as of January 1, 2012, paper savings bonds will no longer be sold at financial institutions.

But savings bonds, introduced in 1935, are not going away. Electronic savings bonds in Series EE and I will remain available through purchase in TreasuryDirect®, a secure, web-based system operated by Public Debt – where investors have been purchasing savings bonds, available 24/7, since 2002.

Opening a TreasuryDirect account is free, and, once it's established, investors can:
  • Buy, manage, and redeem Series EE and I electronic savings bonds.
  • Convert Series EE and I paper savings bonds to electronic through the SmartExchange® feature.
  • Purchase electronic savings bonds as a gift.
  • Enroll in a payroll savings plan for purchasing electronic bonds.
  • Invest in other Treasury securities such as bills, notes, bonds, and TIPS (Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities).

Those currently holding paper savings bonds can continue to redeem them at financial institutions. Bonds, which have not matured, but were lost, stolen or destroyed, can be reissued in paper or electronic form.



Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Consumer Protection
Find resources provided by the FDIC to educate and protect consumers, revitalize communities, and promote compliance with the Community Reinvestment Act and fair lending laws.


U.S. Small Business Administration
Small business is America's most powerful engine of opportunity and economic growth. That's where SBA comes in. SBA offers a variety of programs and support services to help you navigate the issues you face with your initial applications, and resources to help after you open for business.


Federal Trade Commission's ID Theft Resource Center

What is identity theft?

Identity theft occurs when someone uses your personal identifying information, like your name, Social Security number, or credit card number without your permission, to commit fraud or other crimes.

The FTC estimates that as many as 9 million Americans have their identities stolen each year. In fact, you or someone you know may have experienced some form of identity theft.
The crime takes many forms. Identity thieves may rent an apartment, obtain a credit card, or establish a telephone account in your name. You may not find out about the theft until you review your credit report or a credit card statement and notice charges you didn’t make—or until you’re contacted by a debt collector.

Identity theft is serious. While some identity theft victims can resolve their problems quickly, others spend hundreds of dollars and many days repairing damage to their good name and credit record.  Some consumers victimized by identity theft may lose out on job opportunities, or be denied loans for education, housing or cars because of negative information on their credit reports. In rare cases, they may even be arrested for crimes they did not commit.

Visit the Federal Trade Commission's Identity Theft resource website for more information.

 


FDIC Electronic Deposit Insurance Estimator

 

Take it one FDIC-insured bank at a time. Enter all of your personal, business and government accounts for that bank, then go through all three steps. When your report for the first bank is complete, start back here with your next bank and so on, until you have a report for each bank where you have deposit accounts.

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